Beef Roulade with Miso Sauce…

This post is in response to Chris’s request for an asian beef roulade with a sauce to go with it.  A roulade literally means “to roll” in French.  Most roulades are made with either a flat steak (like flank or round) or ground beef.  You roll up the meat with vegetables and roast it as a whole.  I seared mine and roasted it as well.

I used top round because it’s lean and it provides for a pretty even steak to roll.  I pounded it flatter to about 1/8″ thick.  I filled it with a good combination of pak choy (chinese cabbage), carrots, and local forest mushrooms.  There would have been japanese cucumber in it as well but the one I bought from the store was infested with little worms or maggots.  Aaauuwgh don’t get me started! It was gross.

For the sauce, I had to be somewhat creative.  When most people think Asian food they think teriyaki.  I love a good teri sauce, but that’s not original.  Chris wanted originality.  So I broke it down to the basic flavors.

Miso, a paste made of fermented soybeans, is a jack of all trades for japanese cooking.  I started with that as a base.  Some rice wine vinegar should add tang.  Water is needed to dilute the paste a bit.  A spoonful of Sambal hot sauce adds some kick.  Sesame oil must be added for the sweetness and nuttyness.  And lets sweeten it with some mirin or sugar.

The result was a tasty, miso sauce with a little spice.  At first, without the water and mirin, it was nasty.  The miso was too strong, so I had to modify it.  I stood over my food processor adding this and that between tastings to get it right.  After about 5 minutes of trial and error, I got it.  Rolling it up is easy, but make sure you roll it somewhat tight.  If it’s too loose, stuff will fall out and it’s no longer a roulade rather a floppy tube of meat.

Rolling it is easy if you have full slices.  Either get them at a place that slices the meat themselves, like Costco, or slice it yourself to make sure you have a nice long piece ready to roll.  I sauteed the mushrooms and carrots and blanched the pak choy to make sure they were actually cooked.  I didn’t want to risk raw cabbage in the middle of the roll.  After searing the roll in a skillet, I finished it for a few more minutes in the oven.
As for the top round amount, you want one large slice (6″ diameter) per person.  You’ll cut it in half and pound larger so each person can have 1 or 2.

Rolling it is easy if you have full slices.  Either get them at a place that slices the meat themselves, like Costco, or slice it yourself to make sure you have a nice long piece ready to roll.  I sauteed the mushrooms and carrots and blanched the pak choy to make sure they were actually cooked.  I didn’t want to risk raw cabbage in the middle of the roll.  After searing the roll in a skillet, I finished it for a few more minutes in the oven.
As for the top round amount, you want one large slice (6″ diameter) per person.  You’ll cut it in half and pound larger so each person can have 1 or 2.

Beef Roulade with Miso Sauce

Sauce:
1/4 cup miso paste
3 T soy sauce
1 T sambal
4 cloves garlic
1 T sesame seeds
1 T sesame oil
2 t rice wine vinegar or sherry
2 t mirin
2 t sugar
1/4 cup water

Add everything to the food processor and puree until smooth and garlic is processed.  You can mince beforehand to make sure it is.  Save for dressing the roulade. Top roulade with green onions for presentation.

Beef:
top round (5 lbs made 14 rolls and leftover meat)
3 carrots, thinly sliced
2 heads baby pak choy
forest mushrooms (shimeji, enoki, etc)
sea salt and fresh black pepper

Blanch the cabbage and sautee the mushrooms and carrots in olive oil to brown them and ensure they’re cooked.  Set aside.

Cut each slice of meat into half lengthwise and pound each half until meat becomes between 1/8″ to a little less than 1/4″ thick. Season both sides of beef with salt and pepper, then layer the cabbage, mushrooms, and carrots down.  Drizzle some miso sauce over and roll tightly.  Tie with kitchen twine and repeat with the others.

Heat your pan to medium-high and add some olive oil.  When smoking, add the rolls and brown on all sides.  Remove and place in baking pan.  Pour all the pan drippings over the rolls, as well as a spoonful of miso sauce for each.

Bake in 400 F oven for about 10 minutes more for medium-rare at the very center of the roll. The inside takes the longest to cook, so if you want the inside well done, you may have to leave it in there for 20 minutes.

Notice the very middle of mine is rare.  That’s how I wanted it, but you can definitely cook it longer.

Chris, I hope you like the sauce and it’s what you were looking for.

*next up…Mint Julep Ice Cream…*

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